Job Recruiters and Their Emails

Recently I made the mistake of updated my resume on Monster.com. A recruiter alerted me to the fact that I hadn’t updated my resume since 2009. Which makes sense. That was when I started with PragmaticWorks. I recently finished a book so I decided to add that to my resume. I completely forgot that as soon as you update your resume, you’ll be inundated with emails and phone calls. I’m not saying that’s a bad thing. To be wanted in a professional (and personal) level is a great feeling. That said, I’m not going anywhere, anytime soon. I have it quite good with Pragmatic Works.

In any case, a reocurring theme I’ve noticed recruiters is I don’t think any of them have had any basic sales training. Nor have I but I’ve studied sales, copywriting, seo, etc because it makes me a more valuable asset to my company. It seems that recruiters don’t understand simple things like the word “You” vs “I”. If I see “I” more than “You” in the opening email to me, it seems that you are trying to help yourself, not me. Here’s an example:

“I found your resume on Monster and I feel you would be a good fit for the position below. Could you please review the job description below and either email me or call me back?”

So what’s wrong with this? There are 4 reference to I and me and 3 references to “you”. It’s a template. They didn’t take the time to make it personal, make it about me. I mean, if I decide to go to work for this guy he’s going to make a pretty nice chunk of change. I know, PragmaticWorks has a recruiting department. We make a LOT of money placing someone. So how SHOULD he have opened the email to entice me to at least respond?

“Hi Chris. I’m Rob. Your resume made it across my desk this morning and based on your skillset, you appear to be a perfect match for an opening our client is looking for. The company is looking for a developer like you with a strong background in VB.NET, SQL Server and SSIS. If you’d be open to a quick 5 minute call, I’d appreciate the opportunity to talk with you about this position and whether you would be a good fit or not”

Everything here is non-threatening. He’s not saying “You look good, let me make some money off of you”. He’s saying “I have an opening, not sure if you’d be a good fit but I’d at least like the opportunity to talk with you”.

Basic stuff here folks. Don’t send recruits templated emails. Take the time to craft a decent, personal email and the response rate will be much higher.

That said, some of the guys have been doing exactly what I said here. But it’s 1 out of 8.

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